La Liga launches Weibo profiles for its clubs and will help them to grow in China

La Liga’s quest to take on the Premier League in all markets around the world continues as the Spanish league has announced the expansion of their digital strategy in China.

Far from being a flash new marketing campaign aimed at growing interest or increasing the numbers of Chinese people that the league can call fans, what the league have announced is a substantive attempt at putting together a strategy to see the La Liga and its clubs become even more relevant in the country.

The new announcement will see the league itself provide assistance to its clubs, by launching their accounts on Chinese social media site Weibo as well as managing their posts and strategy, which include “daily” posts and “significant” coverage on matchdays, according to the league. So keen are La Liga to get their clubs to get active in China that they are also willing to cover the costs of getting the accounts verified on the platform.

According to the launch, the league is also aiming to become a resource for its clubs in the sharing of content ideas and best practice. After having expanded its team of Chinese social media editors and experts, the tournament organiser will provide its clubs with quarterly updates on best practice and notifications about upcoming Chinese holidays and occasions as well as suggestions for posts. The idea, then, is that the clubs are able to endear themselves to fans in the country, whilst also having a platform to play up their history and club culture to a new audience.

“Clubs are the heart of La Liga. To help grow our presence we must help people to discover the clubs´ stories” said Digital Strategy Director Alfredo Bermejo.

“Chinese consumers have shown growing interest in our competition but entering this market can be complex. Our team works closely with all clubs of La Liga to provide assistance anywhere we can.”

La Liga has made waves over the last few years with their commitment to growing their product around the world, but it’s interesting to see a league take responsibility for helping its clubs in such a direct way.

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Chris McMullan
Chris McMullan 787 posts

Chris is a sports journalist and editor of Digital Sport - follow him on Twitter @CJMcMullan_

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