How Wimbledon maintains its social presence even when all eyes are elsewhere

Those sporting eventually which happen only annually face unique challenging when it comes to their social media accounts. Almost a full year is spent in anticipation, and once it finally comes around, it’s then gone in the blink of an eye.

This is a burden Wimbledon faces every year, and while its Twitter account is quite popular with 3.57m ollowers, it must deal with the reality that not all eyes are tuned in outside of the two-week-long tournament.

But this also allows for Wimbledon to adapt. Simply tweeting out videos and graphics in anticipation of the event won’t always suffice, but what they are doing now will. The French Open, held in Paris, France, is nearing its end, and the results of the other major will create ripples that affect The Championships in London.

Most of the biggest stars have fallen in Roland Garros, as Serena Williams dropped out and Novak Djokovic and Maria Sharapova were defeated in the quarter final. But Rafael Nadal remains, and Wimbledon is keeping its audience updated by providing frequent updates.

Wimbledon get fans ready for the Championships by reporting on the French Open

It’s really the only thing for them to cover, and it’s smart for Wimbledon to keep everyone up to speed. It’s also keen on including historical significance in its social media coverage, as five-time Wimbledon champion Bjorn Borg turned 62 on Wednesday.

With so much time left before the beginning of the tournament on July 2, Wimbledon has a chance to get creative. In mid-May, they decided to celebrate the exemplary moments of the last 50 years by grouping each iconic moment together on the classic grass court.

It’s a fun little exercise used to keep their audience engaged. Surely, when the French Open wraps up and Wimbledon comes closer, the amount of content will be ramped up as anticipation rises.

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